Introduction to the 2 Years Bachelor’s Degree UK Programme

If you are considering teaching in a UK state school, you’ll need to have a degree as well as a recognised teaching qualification. Initial Teacher Education or Training (ITET) programmes across the UK are broadly prevailing, providing a combination of academic study and time in school, as you learn about key teaching methods in the time duration of 3 to 4 years hence, referred to as 4 years teacher training courses UK. The routes, entry requirements, and statutory teaching standards are different depending on where in the UK you plan to train, and ultimately, teach. You can apply through UCAS for the main postgraduate and undergraduate 4 years teachers training courses in England, Wales, and Scotland.

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Teacher Training Courses in England:

In order to teach in a state school in England, you must have a degree, and gain Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) by following a programme of Initial Teacher Training (ITT). You must have achieved minimum requirements in GCSE English, maths, and science if you wish to teach at primary-level. You can teach in independent schools, academies, and free schools in England without QTS, but it is a definite advantage to have it.

UCAS Teacher Training is for postgraduate teacher training courses in England and Wales. Apply through UCAS Undergraduate for all 4 years teacher training courses in Scotland. The entry requirements for teacher training courses in England are mentioned as following:

Academic requirements

Qualifications

Since there is a high need to maintain the quality despite the competition, you must meet the following requirements necessary for the selection in teacher training courses. Some teacher training courses would have many more applications than vacancies available, so the requirements might be higher for 4 years teacher training courses.

  1. For postgraduate 4 years teacher training courses, you will need to hold an undergraduate degree awarded by a higher education provider in England or Wales, or a recognised equivalent qualification.
  2. You will need to have achieved a standard equivalent to grade C/4, or above, in the GCSE examinations in English and mathematics.
  3. If you intend to train to teach pupils aged 3 – 11 (early years and primary), you must also have achieved a standard equivalent to a grade C/4, or above, in a GCSE science subject examination.

Skills Test Requirement

The skills test is no longer part of the entry requirements for 4 years Teacher Training courses in England. Instead, the DfE are replacing the skills test with a new approach, designed with providers. The new approach will allow providers to work with candidates to help them develop their literacy and numeracy skills throughout their course, if needed. However, trainees who remain unable to meet the required level of literacy and numeracy skills will not reach Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). In case you have not achieved the required GCSEs, there are options to study the qualifications through local colleges or at home, through organisations like NEC (National Extension College).

If you studied outside the UK, check the National Academic Recognition Information Centre (NARIC) website to find out whether your qualifications are of an equivalent level to UK GCSEs, A levels, and an undergraduate degree. If you have non-UK qualifications, you will need a Statement of Comparability from NARIC. This can take some time, so you would be required to start the process before you submit your application.

Subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) courses

If your degree subject does not link closely to your chosen teaching subject, you may still be able to apply for a postgraduate teacher training course by undertaking a subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) course. Training providers may ask you to take an SKE course as a condition of your offer if they feel you have the right qualities to become a teacher, but need more subject knowledge first.

Non-academic requirements

Since a teacher needs to maintain an inspiring and interactive personality for both his students and colleagues, there are some non-academic requirements you will need to meet to make sure teaching is the right job for you.

  1. School experience

If you can spend some time observing and helping out with lessons in a local school before you apply, it will help to strengthen your application. You can use the experience in your personal statement, showing what you have gained from it and how it has increased your motivation to be a teacher. There are several ways you can get school experience:

  1. Medical fitness
  • When you accept a place on a teacher training course, your training provider may send you a health questionnaire to find out about your medical fitness.
  • Some applicants may be asked to have a medical examination.
  • If you have a disability, it is helpful if you give us full details on your application, so training providers can try to make any adjustments you may need.
  1. Declaration of criminal convictions

If you have a criminal record, it would not necessarily prevent you becoming a teacher. You will need to disclose any criminal convictions, cautions, or bind-overs that are not filtered, and you will need to agree to an enhanced criminal record check. It is also advisable for you to discuss your circumstances with training providers before you apply.

  1. Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) in England and Wales

This is the Government scheme that replaced the Criminal Records Bureau. This enables training providers to identify people who are barred from working with children and vulnerable adults. Check with the DBS to see what you need to do to comply with these arrangements.

Overseas graduates

If you’re a graduate from outside the European Economic Area (EEA), you may need to apply for a visa before starting your teacher training course.

You can teach in Scotland once you have:

  • Completed a four-year undergraduate course in education or
  • Completed an undergraduate course, and then a one-year Post Graduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) or
  • Qualified outside of Scotland, with equivalent qualifications

Other teacher training courses:

There are a number of new teacher training courses, designed to offer flexibility, and encourage diversity in the profession.

These include:

Most of the programmes are linked to local authorities and involve teaching in schools within these local authorities during the course.

How to join a teacher training course?

Every potential teacher must apply for their mostly chosen 4 years teacher training course via UCAS – an organisation that manages all college and university applications. Although some courses in Scotland remain open until all places are filled, be sure to check throughout the year to see what’s available.

If you submit your application by mid-January, you will have a decision by the start of May. Although many courses in Scotland remain open until all places are filled, so be sure to check throughout the year to see what is available. You can also find out more about what happens after you have submitted your application, direct from UCAS.

Minimum entry requirements to become a teacher in Scotland:

You will need at least the following qualifications in order to get a teacher training course in Scotland:

  • English at SCQF Level 6 and Maths Level 5.
  • Two other National Qualifications at SCQF Level 6, and one other subject at SCQF Level 5 for an undergraduate degree.
  • An undergraduate degree awarded by a UK higher education provider for PGDE programmes.
  • Membership of the Protecting Vulnerable Groups scheme.
  • Classroom experience.

Teacher training courses in Wales:

To teach in a Welsh state-maintained school, you must have a degree, and gain Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) by following a programme of Initial Teacher Education (ITE). All teachers in Wales are also required to register with the Education Workforce Council (EWC).  In Wales, most postgraduate teacher training courses are university-based, and you have a choice of programmes delivered in English or Welsh. QTS awarded by the Education Workforce Council in Wales is automatically recognised in England.

Teacher training courses in Ireland:

To teach in a primary or post-primary (secondary) school in Northern Ireland, you must have a degree and a recognised teacher training qualification. All teachers are required to register with the General Teaching Council for Northern Ireland (GTCNI).

There are two routes available to prospective teachers: a four year undergraduate Bachelor of Education (BEd), or a one year Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE). Initial Teacher Education (ITE) programmes are available from the following universities and colleges in Northern Ireland:

  • Queen’s University School of Education
  • Saint Mary’s University College
  • Stranmillis University College
  • The Open University
  • The University of Ulster

Applications and entry requirements:

For the BEd course at Stranmillis University College, you will need to apply through the UCAS Undergraduate scheme. All other applications are made directly to the relevant university or college. Check the provider’s website for specific course information, tuitions fees, and entry requirements.

It is likely there will also be some non-academic conditions you will need to meet before you can take up your place on the teacher training course. These include a criminal record check which is mandatory for all entrants but there may be other conditions. You need to visit Northern Ireland Department of Education (DENI) for further education. For 4 years teacher training courses for primary education in England and Wales, applicants should apply to the relevant university/college through UCAS. Applications for postgraduate teacher training courses in England and Wales are currently through UCAS 4 years teacher Training courses. Apply through UCAS Undergraduate for all, Primary or Secondary, teacher training courses in Scotland.

Funding and support:

If you are undertaking teacher training in Northern Ireland, you need to check what funding you might be eligible for by visiting NI Direct – Student Finance.

Teaching in other parts of the UK:

  • To teach in an English state school, you must apply for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). With a teaching qualification from a university in Northern Ireland, you may be able to gain QTS without any further training or assessment. You would need to visit the National College for Teaching and Leadership in order to gain further information.
  • To teach in Wales, you must apply for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) through the Education Workforce Council (EWC). With a teaching qualification from a university in Northern Ireland, you may be awarded QTS in Wales in recognition of your status.
  • To teach in a Scottish state school, you must be registered with the General Teaching Council for Scotland (GTCS). You will need to submit a formal application which will assess your qualifications to make sure they meet the academic study and teacher education criteria.

FAQs:

You will need at least the following qualifications in order to get a teacher training course in Scotland:

  • English at SCQF Level 6 and Maths Level 5
  • Two other National Qualifications at SCQF Level 6, and one other subject at SCQF Level 5 for an undergraduate degree.
  • An undergraduate degree awarded by a UK higher education provider for PGDE programmes
  • Membership of the Protecting Vulnerable Groups scheme
  • Classroom experience

To teach in a primary or post-primary (secondary) school in Northern Ireland, you must have a degree and a recognised teacher training qualification. All teachers are required to register with the General Teaching Council for Northern Ireland (GTCNI). There are two routes available to prospective teachers: a four year undergraduate Bachelor of Education (BEd), or a one year Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

To teach in a Welsh state-maintained school, you must have a degree, and gain Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) by following a programme of Initial Teacher Education (ITE). All teachers in Wales are also required to register with the Education Workforce Council (EWC).  In Wales, most postgraduate teacher training courses are university-based, and you have a choice of programmes delivered in English or Welsh. QTS awarded by the Education Workforce Council in Wales is automatically recognised in England.

If your degree subject does not link closely to your chosen teaching subject, you may still be able to apply for a postgraduate teacher training course by undertaking a subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) course. Training providers may ask you to take an SKE course as a condition of your offer if they feel you have the right qualities to become a teacher, but need more subject knowledge first.

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