What is A level qualification UK?

The AS (Advanced Subsidiary) Level is a qualification in its own right, and the AS Level together with the A2 Level forms the complete A (Advanced) Level qualification. The A level qualification UK can be studied by both full-time study in school or FE college as well as part-time in the time span of total 2 years.

Schools and colleges are not legally obliged to offer AS levels and enter students for the relevant exams, so not all of the educational institutes offer them. When choosing you are A levels – including whether you want to stay at your school to study them, or go elsewhere – check what options the institution offers.

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What are the entry requirements for A level qualification UK?

  • You may need at least five GCSEs at grades A*-C mostly or equivalent.
  • However, you may also need a grade B or above at GCSE in a particular subject in order to take it at AS or A level.
  • While a C/4 is a minimum, higher GCSE grades will leave you in a better position.
  • The knowledge of English, mathematics and sometimes science by having studied them in previous classes in essential
  • You must have GCSE grade C or above in English and mathematics in accordance with the specific requirements of some particular educational institutes.
  • You may continue with subjects taken in Years 11 and 12 and/or take new ones whereas there are about 80 AS and A level subjects available.

What are the assessment criteria for A level qualification UK?

  • The majority of subjects in levels AS and A2 are made up of two units each while some of them are comprised of 3 units.
  • The total assessment criteria depending on the written examination and internal assessment may vary from subject to subject, but generally it is done with 70% assessment on written examination and 30% on internal assessment basis.
  • However, practical skills assessment is also involved in some specific subjects including science and arts.
  • All A levels must also include some ‘synoptic assessment’ as part of the A2. This means testing your understanding of the whole subject, and will normally contribute 20% to the full A level qualification UK.
  • A level has gone through some recent changes, moving from ongoing module assessments to 100% final exams, and so is termed ‘linear’.
  • AS levels and A levels have been ‘decoupled’, which means your overall A level grades now depend solely on exams you take at the end of your second year with some exceptions.
  • Previous marks that you achieved for a subject in your AS year could be ‘banked’ and carried over (40%) in order to contribute to your A-level grade.

How do A-levels proceed?

Since A level qualification UK is usually covered in 2 years duration where 1st year constitute the AS level and 2nd year is termed as A2 level and their proceeding may vary according to the institute and the region of UK that educational institute is situated.

Level AS (12th year):

  • You may typically choose three or four subjects to take.
  • Some students take more subjects, in case they are planning to apply to a competitive university (e.g. Oxford, Cambridge) or course (e.g. medicine, law).
  • At the end of the year, you take exams in all your subjects.
  • The relevance of your results depend on whether you are dropping it (if so, this will decide your AS level grade, if your school offers these) or carrying it on (in which case, this will bear no impact on your final A level grade, but could shape your predicted grades).
  • The grade you achieve in any AS level will still go on your UCAS application, along with your predicted A level grades.

Level A2 (13th Year):

  • You may continue with your remaining subjects to achieve the full A level qualification UK.
    At the end of 13th year, your all-important exams will decide your final A level grades due to which A2 level is often referred to as A level. These will test you on content from both years.
  • Depending on the offers you receive, your actual A level grades will determine whether you will be heading straight off to university, going through Clearing or taking a different path altogether.
  • You could pick up an additional AS level subject in your 13th year if, for example, you did not take an AS level in your first year or you need to boost the number of UCAS points when applying to university.

What are the basic features of the AS and A levels?

There are important differences in some of the design features of the new AS and A level qualification UK; however, they also continue to share a number of important features. Common features include:

  1. Students’ grades are reported as A*-E for A level and A-E for AS.
  2. The content requirements are broadly similar in most subjects. For more details about the content requirements for individual subjects, you should refer to each regulator’s website.
  3. The proportion of non-exam assessment has been set at the minimum deemed necessary to assess the essential aspects of the subject that cannot be assessed validly by exam. These judgements sometimes vary between regulators, for example in biology, physics and chemistry for which the approach to reporting outcomes in non-exam assessment is different too.
  4. Assessment objectives and their weightings are the same in most subjects. You can see the detail of these, and where and how these requirements differ on each regulator’s website.
  5. Assessments at A level in all subjects must require students to draw on knowledge and understanding from across the subject content. In most subjects there is a common requirement for students to produce extended responses.
  6. The amount of content in AS qualifications continues to be approximately half that of the full A levels.

What are the after-benefits of A level qualification UK?

  • A level qualification UK can be used as entry to higher education courses at level 4, 5 or 6, further training, or a job.
  • It also serves as a traditional route for entry to university and higher education and training for many professions.
  • If you want to go for a course at some university, you need to see what entry requirements universities ask for and see what A levels are essential for different degrees.
  • You may also lead your A level qualification UK to a foundation degree, Higher National Diploma or Higher National Certificate hence, having multiple career options.
  • You may also consider the higher or degree apprenticeshiproute if you want a degree but without paying the fees. This combines university study with real work experience in a company.
  • You can apply to jobs that offer or support additional training, allowing you to progress further in the concerned organisation.

FAQs:

The AS (Advanced Subsidiary) Level is a qualification in its own right, and the AS Level together with the A2 Level forms the complete A (Advanced) Level qualification.

The A level qualification UK can be studied by both full-time study in school or FE college as well as part-time in the time span of total 2 years where 1st year is constituted by AS level and 2nd year by A2 level.

A level has gone through some recent changes, moving from ongoing module assessments to 100% final exams, and so is termed ‘linear’. AS levels and A levels have been ‘decoupled’, which means your overall A level grades now depend solely on exams you take at the end of your second year with some exceptions.

A level qualification UK can be used as entry to higher education courses at level 4, 5 or 6, further training, or a job. It also serves as a traditional route for entry to university and higher education and training for many professions.

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